Band album – Sabbat UK http://sabbat-uk.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 20:03:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sabbat-uk.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-120x120.png Band album – Sabbat UK http://sabbat-uk.com/ 32 32 Ellevator rides Hamilton with debut album https://sabbat-uk.com/ellevator-rides-hamilton-with-debut-album/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:17:25 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/ellevator-rides-hamilton-with-debut-album/ Sometimes it’s best to avoid your own personal experiences when writing a song. Better not to say too much about what is going on in your head. But sometimes it is unavoidable. Thus, Nabi Sue Bersche found while writing the song “Easy”, one of the first singles released from the debut album “The Words You […]]]>

Sometimes it’s best to avoid your own personal experiences when writing a song. Better not to say too much about what is going on in your head. But sometimes it is unavoidable.

Thus, Nabi Sue Bersche found while writing the song “Easy”, one of the first singles released from the debut album “The Words You Spoke Still Move Me” by the indie-rock band from Hamilton. Lift.

Nabi was raised on a farm outside Guelph in an Evangelical Christian tradition, which included speaking in tongues and an intense belief in miracles. After graduating from high school at the age of 17, she ventured to Australia where she joined an even more intense Pentecostal offshoot.

She left the band, which Nabi now describes as a cult following, after about six months, returning to Canada where she joined her husband, Tyler Bersche (guitars), and close friend, Elliott Gwynne (keyboards, bass), to form the band that would become Ellevator.

“There’s a lot to say about this period of my life, so I’m having a hard time knowing where to start,” Nabi says of his contact with extreme religion. “I am an intense person and I like to devote myself to the people and things I love. I don’t think I wanted to have one foot in and one foot out.

“I have chosen to participate in many situations involving religion. I have grown and learned a great deal about myself through these experiences, whether strictly positive or not.”

The lyrics of “Easy”, wrapped in a catchy synth-pop melody, are sometimes bitter, but above all contemplative:

The handful of flowers we were given the day we were saved

Are blue and gold

And they smell like honey

They all dried up

But they were once so beautiful

Tyler adds: “Learning to analyze what is good and what is bad in these things that have been entrusted to us is not only the work of becoming an adult, but also the work of art, (deciding) what is worth worth keeping and what is worth throwing away.

“The Words You Spoke Still Move Me” was released May 6 on Arts and Crafts, the ultra-hip Toronto label behind art-rock bands like Metric, Stars, Feist and Broken Social Scene. Ellevator will perform a record launch show for the album on Friday, May 27 at the club in Hamilton Bridges (200 Caroline St. N.).

The 12 titles of the album are not all as autobiographical as “Easy”. Nabi learns to express his vision of the world through the prism of external characters, sometimes fictitious. But “escape” remains a recurring theme.

On the song “Slip”, adapted for the radio, singer Nabi assumes the role of a seal woman (or selkie in the Celtic tradition) escaping the clutches of a mythical beast. And the irresistibly amusing “Charlie IO,” tells the story of a young man who tries to find his inner self through hallucinogenic drugs.

Pre-order “The Words You Spoke Still Move Me” https://www.ellevatormusic.com/

“This song is not from personal experience,” Nabi points out when asked about Charlie IO. “Charlie IO is an interesting character. Sometimes we focus too much on ourselves and it can become something that gets in the way of our experience of the world and gets in the way of our relationships.

Following Nabi’s return from Australia to Canada, the newly formed band moved from Guelph to Hamilton in 2010, working under the roots folk-rock name Medicine Hat. The band moved into a more synth-rock direction and, after signing with Arts and Crafts, changed their name to Ellevator, releasing a self-titled EP in 2018 and earning a spot on the Tim Hortons Field stage in front of 24,000 fans as one of the first. acts for the Arkells rally concert.

When Arts and Crafts decided it was time for a full album, the band was encouraged to put together a list of “dream producers” to work with. At the top of the list was Chris Walla, former guitarist and producer of the American band Death Cab For Cutie. To Ellevator’s surprise, Walla accepted the assignment.

Video directed and shot by Cam Veitch

“The Words You Spoke Still Move Me” was recorded over a seven-month period at Tape and Catherine North studios in Hamilton, Tragically Hip’s Bathouse studio near Kingston, and Walla studio in Seattle.

“I think he took what was there, which in our case are very contrasting and dramatic rock songs with big ups and downs, and he just turned the dial on all of that,” Tyler tells about the production of Walla. “The loud parts became incredibly loud and the quiet parts became a real whisper. He turned the dial on our strengths.

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Bear’s Den: Blue Hours Album Review https://sabbat-uk.com/bears-den-blue-hours-album-review/ Tue, 10 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/bears-den-blue-hours-album-review/ Soft-rock duo Bear’s Den, consisting of songwriter Andrew Davie and multi-instrumentalist Kevin Jones, emerged from the UK nu-folk scene of the late 2000s to mid-2010s. In 2006, Jones started the Communion label and publishing house alongside Ben Lovett of Mumford & Sons, and Bear’s Den toured alongside Mumford and early Communion Daughter signees in 2013. […]]]>

Soft-rock duo Bear’s Den, consisting of songwriter Andrew Davie and multi-instrumentalist Kevin Jones, emerged from the UK nu-folk scene of the late 2000s to mid-2010s. In 2006, Jones started the Communion label and publishing house alongside Ben Lovett of Mumford & Sons, and Bear’s Den toured alongside Mumford and early Communion Daughter signees in 2013. Playing fairly standard but tender folk rock ( “Hold your hope with your life,” Davie pleads on lead single “Elysium”), they took a more modest and intimate approach than their more artistic peers or business-minded label co-founders. Led by indie rock producer Phil Ek, the creative breakthrough of 2019 For you to hear MWe traded aphorisms for precise and poignant examinations of growing up around alcoholism (the vast “Hide bottles”) and the difficulty of self-forgiveness (“Evangeline”). They continued this self-questioning streak with the moving “Favorite patient2020s christmas hope EP, where Davie fears he won’t be able to support his partner, exhausted since the early days of the pandemic working in intensive care. On their latest album, blue hours, Bear’s Den are reuniting with longtime producer Ian Grimble to take a closer look at mental health issues. It’s a collection of moving, often heartfelt songs, but the Polish belies the complex feelings Davie writes about companionship and isolation.

Davie focuses largely on the benefits and challenges of intimacy, particularly times when closeness borders on co-dependency. His tender approach becomes an advantage when talking about nested relationships and avoidant partners: any of Bear’s Den peers would love to write a line like “You dreamed in my nightmares/I dream in yours”. On the title track, the only way to get inside her lover’s head is to literally do so, crawling and examining every synapse for trouble. Even when the band nails a soaring, string-driven anthem like “Shadows,” a simple line like “I should know better / But with you, I don’t” complicates the choir’s assertion.

Davie also travels inward, writing about his lack of clarity with an often surprising amount. “Spiders” overcomes its underweight motorik beat with self-lacing but thoughtful lyrics, extrapolating the phrase “stain on your conscience” into “a mural” and a “memorial to all those you have tried to be”. “Selective Memories” is the most impressive tonal balance the band has ever achieved, with lyrics about the loss of a parent with dementia, examining puzzling feelings with a new bite. There’s still some sentimentality in the song, in a verse where Davie hopes her mother can meet her future granddaughter, but Davie ultimately decides he’ll let his bad memories slip away in the absence of closure. For a group determined to reassure themselves, forgiveness through forgetting is a surprisingly harsh conclusion.

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CRITICAL MASS: Trout Fishing tackles covid and isolation in new album https://sabbat-uk.com/critical-mass-trout-fishing-tackles-covid-and-isolation-in-new-album/ Sun, 08 May 2022 07:18:31 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/critical-mass-trout-fishing-tackles-covid-and-isolation-in-new-album/ “When it stops hurting, everything will be fine.” – Trout fishing in America, “Safe House” One afternoon in 1982, at the downtown Shreveport YMCA, Ezra Idlet must have felt magic in his hands. One, two, three, four, five – maybe six – rainbow dishes launched from various locations between 23 and 28 feet from a […]]]>
  • “When it stops hurting, everything will be fine.”
  • – Trout fishing in America, “Safe House”

One afternoon in 1982, at the downtown Shreveport YMCA, Ezra Idlet must have felt magic in his hands.

One, two, three, four, five – maybe six – rainbow dishes launched from various locations between 23 and 28 feet from a 10-foot-tall basket set gently in a net suspended from a hoop intact metal. One of the game’s regulars, a small forward who had written Captain Shreve a dozen years before, asked in astonished exasperation:

” Who are you ? Larry Bird?

“No, I’m his sister,” snapped the long-haired, ear-ringed Idlet, 6ft 9in.

I witnessed this exchange. I may have even witnessed a few of those long distance jumpers.

Ezra was something like a rock star. I knew all about Trout Fishing in America, the folk rock duo he had played in with Keith Grimwood, which I assumed was named after Richard Brautigan’s 1967 surreal short story, which was circulating a lot in would-be bohemian circles at the time. .

Trout Fishing was already an institution, I thought, though checking my memory against the facts, they had apparently only released one full album, “You Bore Me to Death!” at the moment.

I knew the origin myth of trout fishing. When he was at Lamar High School – the “pretentious” public high school in Houston that counts Nobel Prize winner Robert Woodrow Wilson, novelist James Lee Burke, news anchor Linda Ellerbee and actors Jaclyn Smith and Paula Prentiss among its alumni STUDENTS – Idlet formed a country rock/folk band called Wheatfield with classmates Craig Calvert and Connie Mims.

In 1972, Idlet — who had been recruited by several schools in Texas — played basketball for the McLennan Community College Highlanders in Waco. They were a good team – unbeaten at home – but Idlet spent many nights playing solo shows at Poppa Rollo’s Pizza, and Wheatfield seemed like a viable career choice. He therefore chose music and never practiced any other profession. (Although if he had always shot as well as he did that afternoon at Shreveport Y…)

In 1974 Wheatfield added a bassist, and soon after a percussionist drummer. They played nights at the University of Houston and Rice University, and appeared on local television as well as on the inaugural season of “Austin City Limits”.

NAME, GROUP CHANGES

In 1976, they received a cease and desist letter from Oregon that claimed another group owned the name. At the time, they were working with choreographer James Clouser, scoring the rock ballet “Caliban,” based on Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” So they took on the name St. Elmo’s Fire, seen as a harbinger of the storm at the heart of the play.

That year, classically trained Grimwood, who attended the University of Houston and played string bass in the Houston Symphony Orchestra, joined the band after a union lockout. He thought he would eventually return to the symphony.

St. Elmo’s Fire toured Colorado and played across Texas. They scored another rock ballet for Clouser, “Rasputin.” They never got a major label deal, though they approached temptingly. They separated in 1979.

Idlet and Grimwood struck as a duo. Grimwood came up with the name Trout Fishing in America because he liked the book and the response when people asked him what the group was called. Some people got it; others just thought it was weird, but it worked.

And they worked, pretty much constantly, for about 40 years. They were something of an American analogue of They Might Be Giants, the absurd modern rock band whose core is the duo of John Flansburgh and John Linnell.

They Might Be Giants and Trout Fishing in America composed songs that explored the world from the perspective of a curious naive; both had lyrics apparently written from the perspective of children. But there was a quality of unironic warmth in the work of Trout Fishing in America that the angular, sometimes dissonant work of Flansburgh and Linnell lacked.

And so trout fishing in America might really appeal to kids.

Whether that’s what they wanted to do in the beginning may not be relevant; teachers who came to their shows recognized the quality, and soon Trout Fishing in America was pursuing parallel careers – they were both a children’s number and a duo that attracted adult audiences.

As Grimwood and Idlet grew up – as they got married and had children of their own (as well as mortgages and other paraphernalia of adulthood), their songwriting evolved. It was always about what was going on in their lives, usually undramatic daddy rock.

When they played for kids, they juggled and incorporated bits of physical humor. It helped that just by appearing on stage together they could be confused – Grimwood, at 5ft 5in, was shorter than some of the standing basses he played. And he was standing next to Larry Bird’s sister.

They have carved out a unique space for themselves in the culture. They have long since stopped chasing conventional commercial success to make their own way. They were among the first musicians to form their own label and market their music themselves.

In the early 90’s they moved from Houston to Northwest Arkansas – Grimwood to West Fork, Idlet to somewhere near Prairie Grove.

They continued to release records and perform concerts. They have earned Grammy Award nominations, National Indie Awards, multiple Parent’s Choice and NAPPA Gold (National Parenting Product) awards and an American Library Award. They had fans who considered them family. And they also had the family thing. It seemed like they could last forever. As it was, it was only about 40 years old.

Then, like everything else, trout fishing in America was brought to a halt by covid-19.

Keith Grimwood and Ezra Idlet of Trout Fishing in America perform a children’s show in 2015 at the Fayetteville Public Library. (Democrat-Gazette file photo) ‘SECURE HOME’

“Safe House,” their 25th album, is largely a response to the pandemic. Like all musicians, Grimwood and Idlet had to figure things out. They were in Pennsylvania at a show when they found out. They played, packed and drove to their respective homes. They haven’t seen each other for over a month, the longest in over 40 years.

It wouldn’t work. They decided to reunite their families in a pandemic capsule. They decided to be together, play music, live broadcast, write and record. To explore their instruments and some new songs too. They set up a streaming studio in Idlet’s recording studio.

Above all, they wrote.

“Safe House” is in a way a modest record, the product of two highly professional musicians of extraordinary intelligence who know how to underestimate certain elements and rely on their strengths. There is a gentle humor where others might get indignant and a great confidence in their voice. (Idlet and Grimwood tend to compromise on lead vocals, and their harmonies have a pleasing sweetness that fits nicely into their relatively simple arrangements.)

You can clearly hear every instrument; Grimwood’s bass and Idlet’s guitars (he also plays a touch of mandolin and light percussion) each fall into their own space. (There is only one outside musician on the album: Adam Collins of bluegrass band Arkansauce plays vibraphone on “Oh, These Afternoons.”)

But you can hear a certain emotion in the lyrics, a kind of lament in the title track and the album opener sung by Grimwood: It’s so hard to keep it all inside / It’ll be alright. When it stops hurting, everything will be fine.

The song could be interpreted literally, as about a physical space, shelter from a storm. But a safe haven can also be a prison, and the locked-in syndrome is something many of us have at least tasted over the past couple of years. Then Idlet responds with “Knock Me Down,” one of those inevitable songs that immediately feels like it’s been around forever. Of course, he will get up right away.

Idlet’s guitar work shines on “Don’t Be Callin'”. There’s an excellent reimagined cover of Susan Werner’s “Barb Wire Boys”; a very funny but probably journalistically accurate road report, “We’ll Always Have Ardmore”; and a bluegrass workout in “Where’s That Dog Gone Now?”

These are just the immediate highlights; “We Have Not Arrived” sounds like an anthem that could have been taken from a Broadway show, perhaps a collaboration between Lin Manuel-Miranda and Paul Simon in his underrated “Capeman” era. And “Looking at a Rainbow,” with its chorus that reminds us that if we see colors in the sky, the storm must be over, is a closer fitting album of hope.

photo Keith Grimwood and Ezra Idlet forged a four-decade career as Trout Fishing in America. “Safe House”, their 25th album, is a response to the pandemic. BEST SERVED LIVE

Trout Fishing in America was never considered a record-breaking machine; they are living musicians whose highest and best use is as stage performers receiving and reflecting the energy of an audience. The recorded versions of their songs are just that: versions. For the definitive experience? You must be there.

In the bedroom, as the man says.

But we’ve been restricted from being in many rooms with other people for the past few months, and now that we’re only just beginning to venture out, there’s still floating trepidation and anxiety. Trout fishing in America is back on the road; you should check your local listings and their website – troutmusic.com – for schedules and merchandise and such. (They have lots of CDs, downloads and videos.)

One of the worst things that happened to our culture in the second half of the last century was that the word “nice” somehow acquired a pejorative connotation, as if “nice” was not a good thing. to be, or somehow the least desirable. good thing.

It’s a shame, because the perfect way to describe this duo is as a couple of nice, talented guys who pursue the good life by applying their special skills to creating art. It’s a good way to live and a good role model. There is a lot of joy in this music. And peace. And decency.

These are the kind of teachers children deserve and the kind of artists we should all pay attention to.

Perhaps it is fair to assess their entire career.

Hey guys, great shot.

E-mail: pmartin@adgnewsroom.com

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This is why the Beatles’ first live album took a decade to come out https://sabbat-uk.com/this-is-why-the-beatles-first-live-album-took-a-decade-to-come-out/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:30:22 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/this-is-why-the-beatles-first-live-album-took-a-decade-to-come-out/ The Beatles are proof that no matter how popular you are in the music industry, you still can’t release a live album as easily as possible. Beatles fans finally got the band’s first live album 44 years ago. Title, “The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl”, the album became one of their hit pieces before their […]]]>

The Beatles are proof that no matter how popular you are in the music industry, you still can’t release a live album as easily as possible.

Beatles fans finally got the band’s first live album 44 years ago. Title, “The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl”, the album became one of their hit pieces before their separation.

However, fans noticed that the first live album took more than a decade to release, and the reason behind it had nothing to do with the members’ lack of trying.

Two years after the event was taped live, Capitol Records – the band’s US label – began thinking about capitalizing on the Beatles’ popularity.

The idea for a live album was born, but they ran into a problem due to the limitations of technology in the 1970s and a dispute with the American Federation of Musicians when George Martin wanted to record it at Carnegie Hall. from New York.

As this proved impossible, Martin and the Beatles decided to instead tape the band’s first performance at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles.

The creation of the Beatles’ first live album

In August 1964, they played a 12-song set in front of nearly 19,000 fans. As the tape rolled smoothly and the whole performance sounded good, the screams from the crowd made the tapings unnecessary.

“You were recording the band in stereo on two tracks and keeping the vocals separate on the third so you could raise or lower it in the mix. But at the Hollywood Bowl, they didn’t use three tracks quite properly. … The recording seemed to focus more on the wild screams of 18,700 children than the Beatles on stage,” Martin reminded.

The group then continued to perform after their unsuccessful attempts. In 1970, they apparently dropped the idea of ​​releasing a live album as they went their separate ways before “Let It Be” was released a month later.

Capitol immediately approached Phil Spector after the producer managed to make the final album despite its difficulty.

READ ALSO: Why “Never Say Die!” by Black Sabbath Was Desperate After Ozzy Osbourne’s Brief Exit

In 1977, Martin finally got a call from Capitol Records president Bhaskar Menon asking him to listen to the recorded tapes again.

“My immediate reaction was, as far as I remember, that the original tapes sounded rotten. So I said to Bhaskar, ‘I don’t think you have anything here.’ But when I listened to the Hollywood Bowl tapes, I was amazed at the rawness and vitality of the Beatles’ singing, so I told Bhaskar I’d see if I could line up the tapes with the recordings of today,” he said.

The producer began working with engineer Geoff Emerick and the two men, and they managed to salvage 13 of the 22 songs. Martin then convinced the four members to give the live album their blessing, and it was finally released in 1977 – earning several records and accolades despite the Beatles breaking up.

READ MORE: Met Gala 2022 Beef: Did Billie Eilish just call Cardi B weird? [VIDEO]

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Sigrid lets go of fears and doubts in her new album, ‘How To Let Go’ https://sabbat-uk.com/sigrid-lets-go-of-fears-and-doubts-in-her-new-album-how-to-let-go/ Tue, 03 May 2022 07:37:06 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/sigrid-lets-go-of-fears-and-doubts-in-her-new-album-how-to-let-go/ Three years after the release of her critically acclaimed debut album, “Sucker Punch”, Norwegian pop star Sigrid is back to give us a record we don’t want to miss. During a virtual press conference via Zoom on April 25, Sigrid talks about her upcoming sophomore album “How To Let Go.” The singer shared that the […]]]>

Three years after the release of her critically acclaimed debut album, “Sucker Punch”, Norwegian pop star Sigrid is back to give us a record we don’t want to miss.

During a virtual press conference via Zoom on April 25, Sigrid talks about her upcoming sophomore album “How To Let Go.” The singer shared that the album is about letting things go and moving on.

“It’s an album about letting go,” said Sigrid. “[The songs are all] to let go of all those fears and doubts that you collect in [your] early 20s. Letting go of all the relationships that weren’t so good and, you know, that you’ve been through. Let go of some life lessons you’ve learned and move on.

via amplified entertainment

Along with letting go as the central theme of “How To Let Go”, Sigrid also added that the album addresses the concept of pausing and setting boundaries, while still finding joy in it – a concept with which it can resonate.

Sigrid’s “How To Let Go” was first announced on March 11 during a Live broadcast on YouTube. The album is produced by Evil Twin, John Hill, Martin Sjølie, SLY and Zakk Cervini, which will feature 12 new tracks, including the first single and the self-acceptance anthem. “shimmer,” “Burning Bridges,” “It Gets Dark” and “Bad Life” with English rock band Bring Me The Horizon.

Sigrid also shared that there’s one song she considers her favorite song, and that’s “It Gets Dark”, the album’s third single, which was released on March 9. She revealed that the song was the first song she wrote for the album in early 2020 while still on tour.

“I toured intensely for four years or something, and I hadn’t really had a real break. I think at some point I started to get a little confused,” Sigrid admitted She even recalled that there were times when she questioned the concept of home.

“I feel extremely privileged to do what I do as an artist. I am able to travel the world and go to places like London, Los Angeles, New York and a bit of my home [Norway] as well. But you constantly feel like you have one foot in and one foot out,” the singer explained. She then revealed that she felt like living a double life because she felt different in English than in Norwegian. These accomplishments, however, had become Sigrid’s inspiration for penning her brilliant single, “It Gets Dark.”

“I guess you have to get through the negative things to get to the good side of things. You have to have both in a way that you just can’t get either of them. So it’s ‘It Gets Dark,’ and it’s way more of a rock song than what I’ve done before,” she said.

The Norwegian pop singer also opened up about her latest single, “Bad Life,” where she teamed up with Bring Me The Horizon. When asked how the album came about, Sigrid shared that before meeting the band, she had been a fan of them for a few years. Later, she learned that the band also listened to her music.

But according to Sigrid, nothing happened during those times, not until last year when she met Jordan Fish, the band’s keyboardist, last year at the Reading and Leeds festival.

via amplified entertainment

“I was reading [and Leeds festival] in the UK last year backstage and then I saw this guy approach me and my manager. He’s like, ‘Hi! I am Jordan [Fish]“recalls Sigrid. She then admitted that she didn’t recognize Fish at first, but when he introduced that he was from Bring Me The Horizon, Sigrid freaked out. “I almost fell on the floor, like, ‘Oh my god! Ah! Such a fan,'” she said.

Shortly after this meeting, Fish and Oli Sykes, the singer of the group, sent him the demo of “Bad Life”. “A few weeks later, we went into the studio and wrote some lyrics. I added my little twist to it, and that’s how ‘Bad Life’ was born,” Sigrid shared.

As the song addresses mental health issues, Sigrid and Bring Me The Horizon hoped the song could be a “comfort blanket” for their listeners who are going through a tough time, sending a message that “it’s going to pass and get better. “. “I listened to this song so much. It really takes me [up] when I listen to it in the car or if I want to go somewhere,” Sigrid said. “We are so proud of it.”

Now with a new album on the way and huge success under her belt over the past few years – from being a multi-award-winning artist to headlining her own shows, Sigrid turned back to herself in 2019 and said she was proud of herself for “always staying noob” and not changing.

The Norwegian pop sensation said: “I’m really proud of myself for remaining the biggest noob. When I’m home, I always do the same things I’ve always done.

“I’m really proud to still enjoy the same things I do, like playing simscooking tacos four days in a row because I can’t cook, stuff like that,” she added.

Sigrid also gave her young self some advice: set personal boundaries and don’t be afraid to say no. “I think like saying no to [in a sense of], ‘I don’t know if I could sing four days in a row.’ Alright then say that […] because it was a learning process [for me to know] how much I can handle in terms of workload and things like that.

Sigrid’s “How To Let Go” was released on May 6, 2022. Click here to pre-record the new album.

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Roots Rockers SAY ZUZU Unveils Album Of Reissued Tracks https://sabbat-uk.com/roots-rockers-say-zuzu-unveils-album-of-reissued-tracks/ Sun, 01 May 2022 15:49:18 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/roots-rockers-say-zuzu-unveils-album-of-reissued-tracks/ Today, Strolling Bones Records is releasing Here Again: A Retrospective (1994-2002), a reissue of the music of New Hampshire roots rock band Say ZuZu. Strolling Bones founder George Fontaine Sr. first tried to sign Say ZuZu in the 90s, but the label deal fell through; with this retrospective, Strolling Bones reintroduces the band and gives […]]]>

Today, Strolling Bones Records is releasing Here Again: A Retrospective (1994-2002), a reissue of the music of New Hampshire roots rock band Say ZuZu. Strolling Bones founder George Fontaine Sr. first tried to sign Say ZuZu in the 90s, but the label deal fell through; with this retrospective, Strolling Bones reintroduces the band and gives them a second chance.

Stream Here Again: A Retrospective

“For those who have never encountered our music before, here are highlights from five records released between 1994 and 2002. The songs focus on the great inner life of people in small towns like ours,” says founding member Jon Nolan. “This record also recounts a decade of growth for a fiercely independent, self-produced band from New Hampshire that flew under the radar during the height of the alt-country movement of the 1990s. The record’s title, Here Again, is inspired by ‘a song from our 1994 self-titled album. We’ve always sought to write songs that hold up, personal songs that are enduring and can stand on their own in a variety of arrangements. “Here Again” is the “one of those songs. It’s also an apt title for a record that’s an opening salvo from a recently reunited band with their first new studio record due out in 2023.”

Founded by Jon and James Nolan and Cliff Murphy in 1991, Say ZuZu has built an international following through unvarnished live performances, enduring and direct songs about milltown life and electrifying harmonies. The band toured tirelessly from Maine to Texas to Italy, operating out of a decidedly unglamorous 24-passenger school bus, and recorded nine albums before breaking up in 2002. The fact that the band n has ever been acclaimed by peers like Whiskeytown or Old 97s has mystified critics. Their fans attributed their under-the-radar existence to a quirky name and an insistence on staying in the Granite State.

In the late 90s, while performing at the Hi-Hat in Athens, Georgia, Say ZuZu met George Fontaine Sr., owner of Doolittle Records. Doolittle began thinking long and hard about signing Say ZuZu, just as the label was merging with New West Records. Unfortunately, New West had other plans and the deal for Say ZuZu fell through. Two decades later, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, label owner George Fontaine Sr. picked up where he left off.

“During the lockdown, I bought the two Say ZuZu records that we almost released on New West Records twenty years ago,” says Fontaine Sr.. “I was pissed that I never had the opportunity to release these recordings before. They are great records and they hold up.” The sentiment led to a series of phone calls with the band to talk about “doing it right” releasing the material on Fontaine Sr.’s latest endeavor, Strolling Bones Records. The New Hampshire alternative country rock band is reuniting after a 20-year hiatus, returning to the American music world with Here Again: A Retrospective (1994-2002) plus a full album of new material due out in early 2023.

Here Again distills highlights from the band’s Road Warrior era (1994-2002) and serves as the opening salvo for the new album. The reunited band features the band’s two classic line-ups combined into six musicians, including Jon Nolan (vocals/guitar), James Nolan (bass), Cliff Murphy (vocals/guitar), Tim Nylander (drums/keyboards), Jon Pistey (guitar ) and Steve Ruhm (drums/mandolin) – a “mixed” musical family that speaks to the lasting friendships they share that are so rare in music.

Artist-centric independent label Strolling Bones plans to reissue cornerstones of Say ZuZu’s back catalog, including albums Every Mile (2002), Bull (1998), Take These Turns (1997), Highway Signs & Driving Songs (1995) and Say ZuZu (1994). Each of the reissues will be lovingly remastered and will include previously unreleased bonus tracks. Here Again draws from each of these albums, includes deluxe liner notes and historic photos, and features a stunning cover design by award-winning artist, Kathleen Judge.

On Strolling Bones Records:

Born out of a simple desire to create an environment for artists to grow, Strolling Bones Records was launched in 2020 by George Fontaine Sr., who also owns New West Records. Rather than focusing on a singular genre, Strolling Bones Records’ focus is on finding unique voices and visions. Find more information here: walkingbonesrecords.com

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Willie Nelson’s new studio album is out on his 89th birthday https://sabbat-uk.com/willie-nelsons-new-studio-album-is-out-on-his-89th-birthday/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 15:22:00 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/willie-nelsons-new-studio-album-is-out-on-his-89th-birthday/ TEXAS — A man arguably more powerful than any other celebrity in the Lone Star State has a reason for maximum celebration on Friday. Stop what you’re doing and wish Texas living legend Willie Nelson a happy birthday. At just 7 years old, he wrote his first song, later creating hits for Patsy Cline, Ray […]]]>

TEXAS — A man arguably more powerful than any other celebrity in the Lone Star State has a reason for maximum celebration on Friday. Stop what you’re doing and wish Texas living legend Willie Nelson a happy birthday.

At just 7 years old, he wrote his first song, later creating hits for Patsy Cline, Ray Price and others. By the time the 1970s arrived, he had etched his undeniable superstar.

Although he retired in the early 70s, settling in Austin, Nelson became restless and re-emerged in the music industry. Even with a few health issues, he kept his foot on the accelerator, performing at socio-political events to help others.

The Abbott, Texas-born country singer turns 89 on Friday. In a nod to his birthday, his label, Legacy Recordings, released his new studio album. “A beautiful moment” on vinyl. This is Nelson’s 17th album under the label.

Nelson’s longtime musical collaborator Buddy Cannon produced the new album and co-wrote six of the new songs.

The vinyl will be available in black and an exclusive orange at Barnes & Nobles. The album can also be purchased in CD and digital format.

Nelson will perform for his birthday in Austin, Texas, at Opening “Strait from Moody Center” on Friday and Saturday nights around 7:30 p.m., country artist George Strait will headline with Willie Nelson & Family and Randy Rogers Band as special guests.

On Sunday, May 1, Nelson will have a special concert at his ranch in Luck, Texas, with Bruce Robinson as host and performances by guest of honor Nelson, himself, as well as Nathaniel Rateliff, Robert Earl Keen, Margo Price, Ray Wylie Hubbard and Vincent Neil Emerson.

Also, don’t forget Willie Nelson’s 4th of July Picnic and Fireworks, which will take place at the new Q2 Stadium, home of Major League Soccer’s Austin FC, at 11 a.m. on July 4.

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Limp Bizkit could be working on a new album later this year https://sabbat-uk.com/limp-bizkit-could-be-working-on-a-new-album-later-this-year/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:39:48 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/limp-bizkit-could-be-working-on-a-new-album-later-this-year/ 2021-04-27 Limp Bizkit – Cat Badra story, courtesy photo via Limp Bizkit Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit says the band can’t wait to start working on new music Limp Bizkit returned after a long hiatus with a new album, “Still Sucks,” last year, but that’s just the beginning. According to longtime guitarist Wes Borland, the […]]]>

2021-04-27

Limp Bizkit – Cat Badra story, courtesy photo via Limp Bizkit

Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit says the band can’t wait to start working on new music

Limp Bizkit returned after a long hiatus with a new album, “Still Sucks,” last year, but that’s just the beginning. According to longtime guitarist Wes Borland, the band could start work on another new record later in 2022.

“Still Sucks” was a major release for Limp Bizkit, as it was the band’s first studio album since “Gold Cobra” in 2011. Fred Durst and company released a few singles between “Gold Cobra” and “Still Sucks” , but nothing more. Then the group dropped a new song, “Dad Vibes,” at Lollapalooza in 2021, and revealed that a new album was on the way.

Speaking to PRS Guitars, Borland said the band are thrilled to finally release a new full album. Plus, the guys are still creating.

“I’m so excited to finally be able to add new material to our set. I mean, we already change our set every night and make changes and additions to it while we’re in the middle of shows, but to really add some new material (not covers or deep cuts of old albums that we haven’t played in a long time for example: we recently dusted off ‘Nobody Loves Me’ from our debut album) has been a treat for me personally,” said said Borland in the interview “Older songs are so ingrained in my brain that it’s nice to kind of rouse the mental muscles responsible for dealing with the new stuff.”

He added, “Now that ‘Still Sucks’ has sort of cleaned up our pipes, I feel the camaraderie and creativity within the band is at an all-time high. I wouldn’t be surprised if a new album is in the works soon after our 2022 tour wraps up. Anything is possible.”

Limp Bizkit will kick off his 2022 “Still Sucks” tour on April 28 in Tampa, Florida. Find the band’s upcoming tour dates here.

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A Wilhelm Scream releases his new album “Lose Your Delusions” https://sabbat-uk.com/a-wilhelm-scream-releases-his-new-album-lose-your-delusions/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 08:00:09 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/a-wilhelm-scream-releases-his-new-album-lose-your-delusions/ NEW BEDFORD — Reboots, covers and adaptations have been a trend in the music industry over the past two years with artists such as Santana, Korean rapper PSY and Adele making a comeback. After nine years, A shout from Wilhelm also joined the ranks with the release of a new album “Lose Your Delusion”, available […]]]>

NEW BEDFORD — Reboots, covers and adaptations have been a trend in the music industry over the past two years with artists such as Santana, Korean rapper PSY and Adele making a comeback.

After nine years, A shout from Wilhelm also joined the ranks with the release of a new album “Lose Your Delusion”, available on all streaming platforms.

“We always planned to do a new album,” said drummer Nicholas Pasquale Angelini, who has been with the band since 1997. “Then life got in the way on many levels.”

Angelini attributed two years of that delay to the COVID pandemic. Also, their bassist Brian J. Robinson, who lives in Canada, was unable to return to the United States to record.

“I think it could have been a blessing to have some extra time. I was able to really work on my games and I think that made for a better record,” Angelini said.

A Wilhelm Scream's album cover "Lose your illusion."

New music:New Bedford native Ewreckage tops the charts again with new album

A Wilhelm Scream (also known as AWS) is a melodic hardcore band founded in 2003 in New Bedford. The name refers to an iconic movie sound effect scream which is commonly used when a character falls from a great height, is thrown by an explosion, or sometimes knocked down.

Recording with new technology

AWS guitarist and vocalist Trevor Reilly has taken advantage of the downtime during the pandemic to finish building his new recording studio, Anchor End. The new album was the first project recorded in the studio.

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Trivium will focus on touring before starting work on another album https://sabbat-uk.com/trivium-will-focus-on-touring-before-starting-work-on-another-album/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 15:42:12 +0000 https://sabbat-uk.com/trivium-will-focus-on-touring-before-starting-work-on-another-album/ In a new interview with Decker from Wisconsin WZOR (Razor 94.7/104.7) radio station, TRIVIUM guitarist Corey Beaulieu he was asked if he and his comrades have started working on material for the 2021 follow-up “In the Court of the Dragon” album. He replied (as transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET): “No. There’s always material. In our free time, […]]]>

In a new interview with Decker from Wisconsin WZOR (Razor 94.7/104.7) radio station, TRIVIUM guitarist Corey Beaulieu he was asked if he and his comrades have started working on material for the 2021 follow-up “In the Court of the Dragon” album. He replied (as transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET): “No. There’s always material. In our free time, I wrote stuff, just because I needed something to do and I had some riffs, and I was, like, “Live to hell. I’m just gonna kind of start working on it. And then there’s song fragments or song demos that maybe somebody… I know I wrote some stuff and that I did demos for the last album, but when you have three people in the band writing song ideas and riffs and stuff, by the time the album is done, there’s a bunch of stuff that everybody has and we’ve never had. So there’s always a supply to draw from if we need a starting point for a song. We never run out of that.

“We’re excited to be back on tour,” he continued. “We have two records, basically, to promote since we haven’t really been able to tour for [2020’s] “What Dead Men Say”so they’re kind of a combo tour so it’s kind of a double album type tour situation where we’re promoting two [records].

“Now that things are reopening overseas and a lot of other stuff is coming out, we’re going to just focus on the touring side for a while. Since we’ve done two records in a year and a half, we have to space everything out a bit. new material Not everyone expects us to release a record every year from now on.

According to Beaulieu, TRIVIUM albums “generally” released at two-year intervals in the past. “We had released a record, then toured, then two years later [put out another one]”, he said. “That’s basically how our whole cycle has been for our career. At one point, I think there were three years between recordings, but usually it’s two because you tour and then as it is, you keep going. That’s why we have, I think, six albums that came out in October, so we’re pretty consistent with the schedule of what we’re doing. We just felt that since “What Dead Men Say” came out just when everything stopped and we weren’t going to shoot, the whole thought was, ‘Who knows when we’ll be able to shoot?’ Because nobody knew at that time if it was going to take six months, a year, a year and a half, two years – it was unpredictable when the bands were going to be able to tour and do all that. Do we want to go on tour in a year or two with a record that has been out for a year or two? Or when we kick off a tour, get people excited with new material. So we went that route and surprised people with another album. We had all this free time, so why sit around doing nothing, just trying to wait? It’s like we can always write – no one’s stopping us – so we got into it.”

“In the Court of the Dragon” was released last October via TRIVIUMthe longtime label Roadrunner folders. The record was produced and mixed by Josh Wilbour and recorded in the fall of 2020 at Full Sail University in Orlando. The album cover is an original oil painting by the French artist Mathieu Nozieres.

TRIVIUM currently supports MEGADETH and LAMB OF GOD on the 2022 stage of “The Metal Tour of the Year”which kicked off on April 9 at the Michelob ULTRA Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada.

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